Family-centred Practice

The aim of FCP is to use increased parental involvement in their children’s speech and language therapy (SLT) to enhance SLT outcomes for children’s expressive and receptive language, as well as increase parental satisfaction with SLT.

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  • Family-centred Practice

    The aim of FCP is to use increased parental involvement in their children’s speech and language therapy (SLT) to enhance SLT outcomes for children’s expressive and receptive language, as well as increase parental satisfaction with SLT.

    Evidence Rating: Moderate

  • Electropalatography (EPG)

    Electropalatography (EPG) is a computer-based instrument used by specialists, which gives information on the location and timing of the tongue’s contact with the hard palate during continuous speech.

    Evidence Rating: Moderate

  • Earobics

    Earobics (Cognitive Concepts, 1997; Diehl, 1999) is a comprehensive computerised intervention program for training phonological awareness and auditory–language processing.

    Evidence Rating: Moderate

  • Word

    The aim of WORD intervention is to improve children’s word-finding difficulties. Strategies involve encouraging reflection and the use of word finding strategies. As the programme progresses there is an increasing focus on meta-cognition and using words to communicate, as opposed to naming pictures). The intervention has both phonological and semantic components. The intervention evaluation study was conducted in the UK.

    Evidence Rating: Moderate

  • Visualising and verbalising

    Visualising and Verbalising (Bell, 1987) is a technique used to help understanding of language in language-impaired students. Visualising and Verbalising aims to improve mental imagery skills, which then help listening and reading comprehension.

    Evidence Rating: Moderate

  • Maximal oppositions

    Maximal opposition therapy is an approach for speech and language therapists who are working with children who have unclear speech due to phonological impairment. The approach is based on the therapist’s analysis what children know about the adult speech system and what they need to learn to make their own speech clearer. This analysis helps therapists decide what elements of speech to target, so as to get the best results (Gierut, 1992; Gierut, 2001; Gierut, Elbert & Dinnsen, 1987).

    Evidence Rating: Moderate

  • Visual approaches to support speech and language

    The underpinning reasoning for this approach is that children who have language learning difficulties often show strengths in their visual skills (Archibold & Gathercole, 2006). The approach covers a wide range of ways of supporting children’s language learning through the use of additional visual clues.

    Evidence Rating: Indicative

  • Meaningful Minimal Contrast Therapy (MMCT)

    Meaningful minimal contrast therapy (MMCT) is an approach for speech and language therapists who are working with children who have unclear speech due to phonological impairment and is one of a number of contrast therapies which have evolved over the last two decades. The common aim of all these therapies is improved speech production in children with unclear speech due to speech sound difficulties (phonological impairment).

    Evidence Rating: Moderate

  • Morphological awareness training

    Morphological awareness training involves provision of linguistically explicit instruction in morphological awareness for children with language impairment to improve language and literacy outcomes. The intervention is over 10 weeks, children can take part in groups of 2-4, completing two 30-minute sessions per week. Evidence for this intervention comes from an experimental trial in schools where intervention was delivered by a Speech Language Pathologist.

    Evidence Rating: Moderate